Josh Levinger

Adventures at home, abroad, and online

Tag: Hiking Page 1 of 2

Taroko Gorge

Took a train to the wilder east side of the island, to the incredible granite gorge.

Read More

Eastern Sierras

Visited Karen at her dude ranch for a surprise Fourth of July.

Read More

Dharamsala

James and wanted a break from the Delhi heat, and headed up to the mountains. Dharamsala is the home of the largest Tibetan community outside of Tibet, and has a very different feel from the rest of India. We went on a day hike up to Triund, to see the beginning of the real Himalaya. Despite the monsoon rain, it did clear in the afternoon and the views did not disappoint. Having the mountains appear through the mist only added to the ambiance. On the way down we helped a trail worker replace some large rocks; he said he works only for karma, so I guess we got some too. I still don’t understand the distinctions between the varieties of religions in this part of the world. I guess you are just allowed to have as many gods with as many arms as you please. I don’t really see anything wrong with that. There’s certainly something up here above the clouds.

Monks nightly vigil

Monks nightly vigil

Triund

Triund

Macleod Ganj

Macleod Ganj

Hiking in the mist

Hiking in the mist

Making a friend

Making a friend

Edit: Here is a view of our route on Google Earth. We started at around 6000 feet and went to 9527 over four miles. Not bad for a day hike.

Huntington Ravine

This weekend I drove up to the mountains for some work on the MIT cabin at Intervale. By trading my blood, sweat and tears, I now have a key to a great base for further adventures in the Whites. After cutting down trees all day on Saturday, and gorging myself with meat Saturday night, I thought a hike was only appropriate for Sunday. I convinced a few other folks to join me on a loop of Huntington and Tuckerman ravines on Mt Washington. I didn’t tell them that the AMC guidebook lists the route as the “most difficult regular hiking trail in Whites.” If they had been warned, they might not have followed me into the breach.

As it was, they were glad they came. It was a gorgeous, clear fall day, with just the right chill in the air to take the edge off the strenuous climb. The trail starts off on the regular Tucks highway, but after Huntington diverges, becomes very steep. There are parts that require hand over hand climbing, and those unsure of their footing might prefer a rope. I made like a mountain goat and scampered up. Having trail running shoes as opposed to real boots was a blessing, because I could jam my feet in cracks and smear on smooth faces. We topped out of the ravine in the Alpine Garden, and I remembered that it was one of the places we scattered Ann’s ashes years ago. I said a silent prayer as we walked across the field, enjoying the sunshine and the spectacular view. Then we turned left and came down Lion’s Head, instead of Tuckerman. Had dinner at a family restaurant in Lincoln, where they had a painted saw with hymns and a cross on it. A cultural experience, to say the least. Then a hurried drive back to Boston, and an exhausted shower. The perfect end to a perfect weekend.

pano

pano

IMG_1587

IMG_1587

IMG_1553

IMG_1553

IMG_1549.JPG

IMG_1549.JPG

IMG_1543

IMG_1543

IMG_1548

IMG_1548

Partington Canyon

Exploring the lesser known hikes around Big Sur, found Partington Canyon. The Tan Bark trail ascends through a foggy redwood grove, then steeply up to the Tin House (said to be built for Roosevelt, as a quiet spot to write his memoirs). Although I was ready for a swim after climbing 2,000ft in 4 miles, it’s way too cold. Don’t let the color fool you, this isn’t the Tropics.

Tan Bark Redwoods

Tan Bark Redwoods

Fallen Log Bridge

Fallen Log Bridge

View from Tin House

View from Tin House

At Julia Pfieffer Sur SP

At Julia Pfieffer Sur SP

Page 1 of 2

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Lovecraft